what you should know about character building

Many have defined what character building is all about. Without proper and adequate analytical frameworks and perspectives, and mostly the common grounds of philosophies in life, you may have missed the big picture.

The following is a book discussing and analysing values in life. You may download the book, the Bahasa version, from either one of the following sites:
http://bit.ly/29LhETZ
http://bit.ly/29x1oTu
should you have any comments, queries, questions over issues on character building issues, you may contact the author in Jakarta through this mobile number +62 851 0518 7118.


Perpustakaan Nasional RI: Data Katalog dalam Terbitan (KDT)
Sando Sasako.
Nilai-nilai dalam kehidupan / Sando Sasako. – Ed. 2. —
Jakarta : CV Serabdi Sakti, 2016.
xi, 167 hlm. ; 21 cm
Bibliografi : hlm. 165.
ISBN 978-602-73508-3-0
1. Psikologi. 2. Kehidupan. I. Judul.
150


Introductory

This book originally intends to give a brief description on value analyses over human aspects in life, that is ipoleksosbud-hankamnas. The value in political aspects should be described in relation to the legal and law system, domestically. The value in economical aspects has been described in a book titled by “Corporate Financing: Early Warning System Application on Financial Distress Indicators (Measurements)”. The value in national defense and security aspects should be described in relation to the legal and law system, internationally. This book begins with a question of what makes a value and values matter. The value definition analysis is continued with the discussions over its dimension, system, and on cultural contexts in corporations, psychologically and philosophically. Some values are meant and treated sacred in terms of ideology and religions. As it is, it has been exploited and manipulated as a bond to associate the relationship for millenias. The value concepts are then applied to economic goods, to be created, and built upon. On the other hand, the conflicting values can mean one see it entirely different. One see it as a value creation, while the others see it as a value destruction. Relational transgression is named to be an episode of a cycle in the inter-relationships of one human.

Executive Summary

I don’t know you, anymore. It’s one of many understatements of someone to other someone. The transcendental expression reveals everything. It can derive from the five senses (sensed feelings and emotions), perceptions, preferences, tendencies, and so on, just to name a few. There are also other words spoken, language used, gesture, body language, defensive or offensive.
Such annihilation makes the (developing) persons (kids) can loose their in-search-of identity. Some outgoing personalities (ADHD, ADD, or the likes) may still be able to choose between gadgets, television, games, just to compensate, or escape from the ‘pushed’ reality. The opposite is an introvert that dynamic in nature and along a continuum.
Based on a kid’s (user’s) experiences, that one shall assume an identity of one imaginary figure or two. It can be an action figure, Snow White princess, Disney’s cartoon figure, or else (http://bit.ly/1nWrSFq). Some will keep it to himself. While some others are pushing the ilusion to life. Those values are the filtering agents for some to relate and connect with others. It can be the imaginary boss, suborbinates, spouse, buddies, or other LARPing figures.
As people get connected, they get to interdependent one another, directly or not. Some exchanges occur, socially. They comply with each others’ terms of engagements. Some will say it as a cost and benefit. While others, such as Harold Kelley and John Thibaut, will say it as reward and cost, maximise the rewards while minimising the costs in maintaining any relationship.
Some feeds and consumes, while some others produce, vice versa. The products to be consumed in any social exhange or relationships are emotional, social (identity), instrumental, opportunity. The imbalances, I don’t get what I want, I am not well-compensated, will create some degree of dissatisfaction, that leads to mounting complaints and may aggravate and severe the relationships.
Values in Life is what the book about. The discussions and analyses.

Tags:
Psychology, International Relations, Humanities, Peace and Conflict Studies, Mergers & Acquisitions, Human Rights, Higher Education, Human Resources Management, Strategic Management

Keywords:
strategic management, mergers & acquisitions, human relations, human bonding, value exploitation, value manipulation, conflicting values, violence, terrorism, game theory


The Six Pillars of Character®

The Six Pillars of Character

The Six Pillars of Character is a framework for teaching good character and is composed of six ethical values (characteristics) everyone can agree upon: Trustworthiness; Respect; Responsibility; Fairness; Caring; and Citizenship. Each of the six character traits are used within our CHARACTER COUNTS! program to help instill a positive learning environment for students and a “culture of kindness” making schools a safe environment for students to learn. The Six Pillars of Character values are not political, religious, or culturally biased. In fact, every year since 1995 our program has been officially recognized and endorsed by the U.S. Senate and The President of the United States.

Use the mnemonic acronym of T.R.R.F.C.C. to help remember each pillar.

Trustworthiness
Think “true blue“ • Be honest • Don’t deceive, cheat, or steal • Be reliable – do what you say you’ll do • Have the courage to do the right thing • Build a good reputation • Be loyal – stand by your family, friends, and country

Respect
Treat others with respect; follow the Golden Rule • Be tolerant and accepting of differences • Use good manners, not bad language • Be considerate of the feelings of others • Don’t threaten, hit or hurt anyone • Deal peacefully with anger, insults, and disagreements

Responsibility
Do what you are supposed to do • Plan ahead • Be diligent • Persevere • Do your best • Use self-control • Be self-disciplined • Think before you act • Be accountable for your words, actions, and attitudes • Set a good example for others

Fairness
Play by the rules • Take turns and share • Be open-minded; listen to others • Don’t take advantage of others • Don’t blame others carelessly • Treat all people fairly

Caring
Be kind • Be compassionate and show you care • Express gratitude • Forgive others • Help people in need • Be charitable and altruistic

Citizenship
Do your share to make your school and community better • Cooperate • Get involved in community affairs • Stay informed; vote • Be a good neighbor • Obey laws and rules • Respect authority • Protect the environment • Volunteer


http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin364.shtml
Activities for Building Student Character, School Community

In an already packed school day, finding time for character education can be a challenge. Most of these ideas can be worked seamlessly into the school day to build student character and to develop a sense of community in your school.

With all of the things that your school does for its students, how does it address one of its primary objectives–not just teaching students, but helping them to become good people? Every school can set a tone of honesty, respect, and kindness toward others. To help you get started, explore these ideas.

Pillars of Character

The first and most important advice for those who want to build character in students–and a sense of community in their school–is to focus on the Six Pillars of Character. These “pillars”– identified by the Josephson Institute of Ethics–are trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, fairness, caring, and citizenship. Other resources sometimes also include three additional qualities: courage, diligence, and integrity.

The Cleveland County Schools of North Carolina recommend emphasizing one trait of good character each month, with bulletin boards, writing assignments, and morning announcements. Students may pen slogans about the trait of the month, and a special section of the library might be designed to offer students easy access to the biographies and other stories of people who exemplify the best of each trait.

The following ideas are organized by the trait they most closely address. Because the traits are interrelated, the activities often support more than one aspect of good character.

Trustworthiness

In Character Count’s Values Jar activity, students are rewarded with a marble placed in a jar when one (or more) of them is spotted “practicing a pillar.” Emphasis is on the quality of the act, not on quantity. The group is rewarded with a special treat when the jar is filled. Trustworthiness plays an especially important role in this project because the acts that are recognized must be authentic and well meaning, not exclusively the means to an end.

Helping Heroes, Enhancing Character

Promoting good character is even more necessary in unsettled times. Who are your students’ heroes? Expand their understanding by introducing them to programs that seek to help true heroes, those who put themselves at risk to save others. Finding ways to support heroic efforts builds character.

Because the military can often only offer transportation to specific bases in the United States, Operation Hero Miles takes donations of frequent flyer miles to supply soldiers and their families with free airline tickets in times of need.

Any Soldier shares information about volunteer contacts in the military who can take delivery of care packages and will place them in the hands of soldiers who do not receive much mail.

Have the students illustrate the Josephson Institute’s aspects of trustworthiness through art. These aspects are honesty (in what you say and do), integrity, reliability, and loyalty. Post their reflections on these concepts with the artwork around the school.

Establish a “board game bank” to which students donate board games, especially those that reinforce strategy skills and educational concepts. Students can borrow games overnight or for weekends. Students may operate the bank and track its progress.

The Center for Character Development shares a lesson called Building Trustworthiness that uses a wall built of empty shoeboxes to represent the aspects of character and illustrate the value of each pillar. This can be used to introduce the concepts, and then the school might establish a “wall of character”–with shoeboxes or in paper form on a bulletin board — that contains specific acts of character that groups of students have performed.

Respect

Every teacher at one time or another has cringed at the personalities children choose to admire. The K-12 Giraffe Heroes Program provides a free lesson that opens students eyes to the true heroes of our world–people who pursue just causes, often at great personal cost and risk. Use the lesson to encourage students to identify appropriate heroes. Then invite them to design posters about the individuals. They may include facts, quotes, and illustrations. Create a display of the posters in a “hall of achievement.”

Organize a corps of peer helpers for new students. These helpers may serve as friends or even tutors. They might generate “guides” to the school for newcomers, with rules, a map, insider “tips,” important dates to remember, and more.

Invite guests to speak about positive character traits. Students may ask informed, thoughtful questions. The experience will reinforce the importance of good manners and respectful tone when dealing with guests and authority figures.

Bullying shows a complete disregard for the respect of others, and often their property. Give students the help they need to avoid conflict and handle it when it does occur. Sharing advice in the form of a message board in a common area, a newsletter, or in announcements can be effective. For some suggestions about what kids need to know, see Tips for Keeping the Peace and Bullying Advice for Kids. The PBS resource It’s My Life also offers information about bullies in a kid-friendly form. These resources even help those who bully to identify themselves and alter their behavior.

Responsibility

Ask students to write pledges for the character traits that describe how they will fulfill their promise to follow each pillar. Then have them sign the pledges. Keep the signed pledges on file and refer to them when behavior doesn’t reflect the pillars of character.

Set up a peer-tutoring program. Tutoring may occur during, before, or after school and may feature students working with partners in the same grade or another.

Increase the number of jobs students may perform at school. Some ideas include making morning and afternoon announcements; helping the school nurse; assisting in the library, office, or other locations; turning in attendance forms and carrying out other daily tasks between classrooms and the office or cafeteria; and serving as safety patrols.

Offer training to youth leaders–such as class officers, student council members, and committees–and explain what is expected of them in those roles. Highlight the leaders’ responsibilities to their fellow students as examples of good character.

Fairness

How many times have students told you that school or classroom rules are not fair? Be ready to counter their complaints by basing rules on the traits of character. When appropriate, students can help to design the rules and choose the consequences of violations.

Focus on and reward academic integrity. Encourage students to complete all of their assignments and do their own work, and show them how to properly cite the ideas of others. Consider an “Honest Abe” or “Worker Bee” award for those who do their individual best.

How do your school’s sports teams and other groups reflect on your school? Have coaches and supervisors share their character and team building suggestions.

Instruct students who generate the school paper to seek journalistic integrity–attention to detail, fairness, accuracy, and balance–in what they report. Editorials and articles should be clear in what is fact and what is opinion. The writers should proudly put their names on every article they publish.

Food for Thought

Have you heard of Craig Kielburger, founder of Free the Children? Kielburger began speaking out for children’s rights at the age of twelve.

Or maybe you’ve heard of 11-year-old Annie Wignall, who created the Care Bags Foundation, an organization that distributes games, toothbrushes, books, and more to kids during difficult times?

Or Jason Crowe? At the age of ten, he was so moved by the story of Vedran Smailovic, a cellist who played his instrument in a war zone for days to honor 22 people who died in an attack on a bakery, that he raised money to construct a statue of the musician in Sarajevo.
Could one of your students be the next to make a profound difference in the world?

Caring

The Random Acts of Kindness Foundation provides Educator Resources including project ideas such as RAK Sightings!, which gives students and staff the opportunity to secretly submit students’ random acts of kindness and then rewards the doers with special certificates.

Have students identify a need in the school or community and develop a plan to help. This might take the form of a book and magazine drive for a retirement home, crocheting hats and blankets for newborns, or another project that displays care for others.

Structure volunteer programs within the school, such as opportunities for students to help out in life skills classes, read or tutor young children, assist in the computer lab, aid students in the library, provide support to students who are recovering from an injury or dealing with a medical condition, or gather work for students who miss school.

Collect donations for a worthy organization, preferably one that serves children. One such group is The Smile Train, which arranges for free surgeries for poor children who have cleft lip and palate. The students might conduct a recycling project, hold a penny drive, do work for donations, or take pledges for biking or walking or dancing. For a list of charitable organizations started by kids, see Idealist.org.

Citizenship

Follow the news. Share stories from your own community and the national news headlines about people who possess the character traits. Ask local leaders to address the students. The Giraffe Heroes Web site has a wonderful collection of Giraffe Profiles that is rich in stories of real people who personify good character and would be an ideal library from which to select tales to share with students.

Plan, or have your students organize, patriotic events. The Cleveland County Schools suggest a “Red, White, and Blue Day” and other events could be held around patriotic holidays. You might schedule a concert that features patriotic musical selections by a band or chorus. Readings of quotes or stories about the presidents can also be shared as part of the school day, particularly near the time of President’s Day.

Involve students in beautification and/or environmental projects around the school and in the community. Local environmental organizations might invite students to join in water testing or ask for their assistance in constructing bat houses or bird nesting boxes, cleaning community parks, and more.

Help community members who are in need with clothing and/or food drives. Some children’s clothing may be reserved for students within the school who may need it.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FROM EDUCATION WORLD

The Giraffe Project: Encouraging Kids to “Stick Their Necks Out” for Others
Cross-Age Tutoring: A Helping Hand Across the Grades
Teacher Feature: Jerome Hammes
A “Signature Event”: The Autograph Auction as a School Fundraiser

STILL MORE RESOURCES

Character Quotes
Need to give your students food for thought? PBS provides quotes from former presidents about character.

Tolerance.org
Visit Tolerance.org to follow current news about the effort to fight hate and promote tolerance. The site provides sections for teachers, parents, teens, and kids.

Editor’s note: While some links go to archive pages, Education World still believes that the content on those links are useful. Please share your personal character building and school morale stories with us by emailing editor[at]educationworld.com. We welcome your bylined articles.


http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/character-building
Collins English Dictionary
character-building
(?kær?kt?b?ld??)
adjective
improving certain good or useful traits in a person’s character, esp self-reliance, endurance, and courage ? The Institute sends people aged between 17 and 25 on character-building ‘expeditions’., ? The experience of boarding school was character-building., ? Lots of people think sport is character-building.


http://www.hmc.org.uk/blog/importance-character-building/
The importance of character building
Heidi Salmons, 24 December 2014

Independent Education Today, 24/12/14, HMC member Mark Steed, Principal of Berkhamsted School discusses the role independent schools play in building the character of their pupils

As a child, when my mother wanted me to do something that I didn’t really want to do, she would describe the experience as “character-building”. For her, the term was a catch-all that would cover anything from visiting an elderly relative, to speaking in public, to conquering a peak in the Lake District – usually in the pouring rain. Looking back, she was right – those formative experiences made an enormous contribution to the person that I am today.

The word “character” derives from the Greek kharasso- (???????), which means “I engrave”. Character is something that is “etched into” us by the experiences that we have as we go through life.

Character building experiences take us out of our comfort zones and force us to ‘dig deep’ to find new resources within ourselves.

The experiences that we have when we are young are particularly influential for they shape the adult that we become. That is why Independent Schools are in the business of character-building.

Good schools do so much more than focus on attaining a top set of examination passes. They seek to develop the whole person. Indeed, some of the most important parts of a good education take place outside the classroom – for these are the parts of the curriculum that provide the most character-building opportunities. It is for this reason that many independent schools have a commitment to an all-round education that aims to give young people a range of experiences which will both stretch and challenge them.

In every school there will always be those for whom the stage, the concert hall, the sports field and the expedition centre will be a second home and independent schools have an outstanding track record of providing the facilities and expertise that will allow these pupils to develop their talents to the highest possible level. The number of former independent school pupils who make it to the top in music, theatre and sport is testimony to the sector’s collective success in these areas. However, we must also recognise that for others these arenas provide challenges which take them out of their personal comfort zones: some young people find that performing or speaking in public doesn’t come naturally; others dislike physical challenge in any of its forms. This is genuine character-building territory.

Independent schools invest considerable resources into providing specialist facilities, staffing and time to provide outstanding extra-curricular programmes. They are fortunate enough to have specialist sports pitches and indoor spaces, swimming pools, theatres, music practice rooms, rehearsal spaces. They do so, not just to provide for a sporting, theatrical and musical elite, but also to provide opportunities for all. One of the significant differences between the maintained and independent sectors is the extent to which a school can provide an extra-curricular programme – not just for a few, but for all.

At Berkhamsted, every pupil is expected to be involved in a play, to sing on stage in a choir, to represent the school at a sport and to serve the local community. We believe that every pupil should have the opportunity to experience the teamwork and camaraderie that comes from being in a dramatic production, a choir or from being part of a sports team. Above all, every pupil should be taken out of their comfort zone – to have to do something that they would rather not do, but something of which they would be very proud to have achieved after the event.

Outdoor education in all of its forms has an enormous part to play in building character. Young people learn more about themselves and about their peers when they are exposed to challenging situations, be that camping out for the very first time, abseiling down a cliff or completing a high ropes course.

Outdoor education provides opportunities for young people to face fears and to manage risk. Sometimes the lessons are learned the hard way: a poorly constructed shelter or the wrong choice of clothing can mean a damp few hours, but the individual is wiser the next time. Few meals are more satisfying than those cooked on a camp-fire outside one’s tent with one’s friends after a day navigating one’s way around the Lake District or Brecon Beacons. Memories, friendships, trust and, of course, character are forged here.

It is for these reasons that Berkhamsted has made outdoor education a compulsory part of its wider curriculum so that every pupil has a ‘bushcraft’ experience and the opportunity to sleep under canvas. Climbing and ski clubs, a vibrant Combined Cadet Force and an extensive Duke of Edinburgh Award programme give further opportunities in these areas.

Schools are under increasing pressure to deliver measurable results, but some of the most significant parts of education don’t lend themselves to metrics – building character falls into this category. It is arguably the most important thing that we do.


http://ie-today.co.uk/Article/the_importance_of_character_building_
The importance of character building
Dave Higgitt | December 24, 2014

Berkhamsted School Principal Mark Steed discusses the role independent schools play in building the character of their pupils

As a child, when my mother wanted me to do something that I didn’t really want to do, she would describe the experience as “character-building”. For her, the term was a catch-all that would cover anything from visiting an elderly relative, to speaking in public, to conquering a peak in the Lake District – usually in the pouring rain. Looking back, she was right – those formative experiences made an enormous contribution to the person that I am today.

The word “character” derives from the Greek kharasso- (???????), which means “I engrave”. Character is something that is “etched into” us by the experiences that we have as we go through life.

Character building experiences take us out of our comfort zones and force us to ‘dig deep’ to find new resources within ourselves.

The experiences that we have when we are young are particularly influential for they shape the adult that we become. That is why Independent Schools are in the business of character-building.

Good schools do so much more than focus on attaining a top set of examination passes. They seek to develop the whole person. Indeed, some of the most important parts of a good education take place outside the classroom – for these are the parts of the curriculum that provide the most character-building opportunities. It is for this reason that many independent schools have a commitment to an all-round education that aims to give young people a range of experiences which will both stretch and challenge them.

In every school there will always be those for whom the stage, the concert hall, the sports field and the expedition centre will be a second home and independent schools have an outstanding track record of providing the facilities and expertise that will allow these pupils to develop their talents to the highest possible level. The number of former independent school pupils who make it to the top in music, theatre and sport is testimony to the sector’s collective success in these areas. However, we must also recognise that for others these arenas provide challenges which take them out of their personal comfort zones: some young people find that performing or speaking in public doesn’t come naturally; others dislike physical challenge in any of its forms. This is genuine character-building territory.

Independent schools invest considerable resources into providing specialist facilities, staffing and time to provide outstanding extra-curricular programmes. They are fortunate enough to have specialist sports pitches and indoor spaces, swimming pools, theatres, music practice rooms, rehearsal spaces. They do so, not just to provide for a sporting, theatrical and musical elite, but also to provide opportunities for all. One of the significant differences between the maintained and independent sectors is the extent to which a school can provide an extra-curricular programme – not just for a few, but for all.

At Berkhamsted, every pupil is expected to be involved in a play, to sing on stage in a choir, to represent the school at a sport and to serve the local community. We believe that every pupil should have the opportunity to experience the teamwork and camaraderie that comes from being in a dramatic production, a choir or from being part of a sports team. Above all, every pupil should be taken out of their comfort zone – to have to do something that they would rather not do, but something of which they would be very proud to have achieved after the event.

Outdoor education in all of its forms has an enormous part to play in building character. Young people learn more about themselves and about their peers when they are exposed to challenging situations, be that camping out for the very first time, abseiling down a cliff or completing a high ropes course.

Outdoor education provides opportunities for young people to face fears and to manage risk. Sometimes the lessons are learned the hard way: a poorly constructed shelter or the wrong choice of clothing can mean a damp few hours, but the individual is wiser the next time. Few meals are more satisfying than those cooked on a camp-fire outside one’s tent with one’s friends after a day navigating one’s way around the Lake District or Brecon Beacons. Memories, friendships, trust and, of course, character are forged here.

It is for these reasons that Berkhamsted has made outdoor education a compulsory part of its wider curriculum so that every pupil has a ‘bushcraft’ experience and the opportunity to sleep under canvas. Climbing and ski clubs, a vibrant Combined Cadet Force and an extensive Duke of Edinburgh Award programme give further opportunities in these areas.

Schools are under increasing pressure to deliver measurable results, but some of the most significant parts of education don’t lend themselves to metrics – building character falls into this category. It is arguably the most important thing that we do.


http://www.8keys.org/
8 Keys of Excellence Character Education Program

The 8 Keys of Excellence character education program guides young people toward a positive future full of confidence, motivation, creativity, team work, leadership and valuable life principles.

The Excellence Effect Movement – On our way to changing the lives of 50 million children
The Excellence Effect is a movement to build excellence in the lives of young people worldwide through the 8 Keys of Excellence family and school character programs. Many of today’s most distinguished and respected thought leaders are advocates of the 8 Keys of Excellence character-building principles. View their videos below.

The 8 Keys are:
Integrity
Failure Leads to Success
Speak With Good Purpose
This Is It! Commitment
Ownership
Flexibility
Balance

A major study by Dr. Victor Battistich, an expert in the field who devoted much of his adult life to the study of character education, found only two factors showed a significant direct link to improving good character and effectively preventing bad behavior: positive relationships with one’s family and a sense of connectedness to school. 8 Keys of Excellence address both areas with its school character education program and family character development program.

“As students grow in character, they grow in their capacity and commitment to do their best work, do the right thing and lead lives of purpose. Character education done early and well, puts students toward successful life outcomes.” – Dr. Victor Battistich

For nearly 30 years in SuperCamp learning and life skills programs and Quantum Learning school training, the 8 Keys of Excellence have helped young people embody valuable life principles that lead to positive habitual behavior, added confidence and increased motivation.

8 Keys of Excellence School Program

The 8 Keys of Excellence school character education program can provide K-12 teachers with a full year of character education lesson plans, online resources, training and support. Already over five million students have been positively influenced by the 8 Keys.

“The 8 Keys of Excellence have had a very positive impact on morale, behavior and character education efforts at the elementary schools. Many teachers and parents continue to let me know how the language of the Keys is evident, not only throughout the school, but throughout the community as well.” – Dan St. Romain, Alamo Heights Independent School District, San Antonio, Texas.

Building character in students through the 8 Keys of Excellence helps young people realize their greatness and enables schools to achieve better results.

8 Keys of Excellence Family Program

The 8 Keys of Excellence family character development program gives parents a simple and engaging eight-week action plan for establishing core character principles in their kids, strengthening family relationships and deepening the feeling of belonging, safety and connectedness.

When you register for this free program, you gain login access to the family area of this website, which contains a wealth of 8 Keys resources, videos, a MyFamily page where you can keep notes throughout the program and a discussion board to interact with other families.

Each week for eight weeks, your family will receive an email that links to the Key-of-the-week’s web page. Each Key’s page leads your family through a 20-30 minute conversation and activity designed to give meaning and insights into that Key. When the eight weeks are over, we’ll continue to send you information periodically to reinforce and enhance your family’s learning and character development.


http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/character-building
http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/character-building?page=2
Quotes About Character Building

“True education does not consist merely in the acquiring of a few facts of science, history, literature, or art, but in the development of character.”
— David O. McKay

“Yoga says instinct is a trace of an old experience that has been repeated many times and the impressions have sunk down to the bottom of the mental lake. Although they go down, they aren’t completely erased. Don’t think you ever forget anything. All experiences are stored in the chittam; and, when the proper atmosphere is created, they come to the surface again. When we do something several times it forms a habit. Continue with that habit for a long time, and it becomes your character. Continue with that character and eventually, perhaps in another life, it comes up as instinct. (92)”
— Swami Satchidananda, The Yoga Sutras

“God has a way of picking a “nobody” and turning their world upside down, in order to create a “somebody” that will remove the obstacles they encountered out of the pathway for others.”
— Shannon L. Alder

“Choose to be good and kind and tolerant regardless of the situation or who’s involved, because life is more a matter of developing character than of dishing out just rewards.”
— Richelle E. Goodrich, Smile Anyway: Quotes, Verse, & Grumblings for Every Day of the Year

“I believe the main purpose of life is to accept with gratitude what you’ve been blessed with so that you may use those gifts to mold yourself into the best person you can possibly be. Learning to discern things of true value from those of little or no worth is part of the process.”
— Richelle E. Goodrich, Smile Anyway: Quotes, Verse, & Grumblings for Every Day of the Year

“I watched them tearing a building down, A gang of men in a busy town. With a ho-heave-ho and a lusty yell, They swung a beam, and the side wall fell. I asked the foreman: “Are these skilled– And the men you’d hire if you had to build?”
He gave me a laugh and said: “No, indeed! Just common labor is all I need. I can wreck in a day or two What builders have taken a year to do.”
And I thought to myself as I went my way, Which of these roles have I tried to play? Am I a builder who works with care Measuring life by a rule and square? Am I shaping my deeds to a well made Plan, Patiently doing the best I can? Or am I a wrecker, who walks the town Content with the labor of tearing down?”
— Edgar A. Guest

“The writer’s characters must stand before us with a wonderful clarity, such continuous clarity that nothing they do strikes us as improbable behavior for just that character, even when the character’s action is, as sometimes happens, something that came as a surprise to the writer himself. We must understand, and the writer before us must understand, more than we know about the character; otherwise neither the writer nor the reader after him could feel confident of the character’s behavior when the character acts freely.”
— John Gardner, The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers

“Never miss an opportunity to be truly and deeply humiliated! The shame will carve you down to an individual of exquisite layering, and in the process, etch within you the arcs of exceptional narrative.”
— Ashim Shanker, Sinew of the Social Species

“Your story is not a picture of life; it lacks the elements of truth. And why? Simply because you run straight on to the end; because you do not analyze. Your heroes do this thing or that from this or that motive, which you assign without ever a thought of dissecting their mental and moral natures. Our feelings, you must remember, are far more complex than all that. In real life every act is the resultant of a hundred thoughts that come and go, and these you must study, each by itself, if you would create a living character. ‘But,’ you will say, ‘in order to note these fleeting thoughts one must know them, must be able to follow them in their capricious meanderings.You have simply to make use of hypnotism, electrical or human, which gives one a two-fold being, setting free the witness-personality so that it may see, understand, and remember the reasons which determine the personality that acts.”
— Jules Verne, In the Year 2889

“Life is a character-building opportunity that we all volunteered for.”
— Richelle E. Goodrich, Smile Anyway: Quotes, Verse, & Grumblings for Every Day of the Year

“Take the time out to have a look at yourself, it might help you to appreciate yourself better.”
— Shampa Sharma

“You alright?’ Frey asked him. Crake gave him an accusing glare. ‘I thought I’d given up all dignity long ago when I joined this crew,’ he said. ‘But this? This is a new low, Frey.’ ‘It’s character-building,’ said Frey.”
— Chris Wooding, The Ace of Skulls

“At least in the world we know, it takes trials to make something beautiful and useful out of the raw materials of life. The student’s struggle with truth develops his intelligence; the athlete’s struggle with his records and his opponents helps to develop his muscles and coordination; the musician’s struggle with more difficult pieces develops his playing skill; and the soul’s struggle with the trials of life helps to build character.”
— Warren W. Wiersbe, Why Us?: When Bad Things Happen to God’s People

“Young bodies are like tender plants, which grow and become hardened to whatever shape you’ve trained them.”
— Desiderius Erasmus

“One of the most critical decisions made in life is choosing with whom to spend your time. For it is those close relationships that gradually mold our character until we become a reflection of the company we keep.”
— Richelle E. Goodrich, Making Wishes: Quotes, Thoughts, & a Little Poetry for Every Day of the Year

“We never plant trees in other people’s yard and hope them to grow. We plant them in ours, water them and take care of them. We should do the same with our lives. Never lay it on others.”
— Saru Singhal

“Don’t seek to be respected by everyone, rather seek to be worthy of being respected by everyone.”
— Bohdi Sanders, Modern Bushido: Living a Life of Excellence

“Allow me to tell you, Mr Taylor”, said I, but quietly as the occassion demanded, “that one gentleman does not rejoice at the misfortune of another in public”.”
— William Golding, Rites of Passage

“Give someone you wronged a chance to express their true feelings and learn about yourself and your shortcomings.”
— Unarine Ramaru

“Your reputation is what others think of you; your character is what you truly are. Reputations can be manipulated; character can only be developed and maintained.”
— Bohdi Sanders, Men of the Code: Living as a Superior Man

“Sometimes all you need is to forgive yourself.”
— Unarine Ramaru

“loneliness is a great teacher and a master test of character”
— Ernest Agyemang Yeboah

“The only relevance worth to pursue, is living your passion through your interests.”
— Unarine Ramaru

“You can’t get what you want, if the intentions are solely directed for self-benefits.”
— Ashish Patel

“Her father dropped her off in front of the place where she was to live and left the engine running. Lila Mae removed the two suitcases from the back of the pickup truck. The suitcases were new, with a formidable casing of green plastic. Scratchproof, supposedly. Her father had only been able to afford them because they were, manufacturer’s oats aside, scratched – gouged actually, as if an animal had taken them in its fangs to teach them about hubris.”
— Colson Whitehead

“Experience and wisdom are more tangible than materialism.”
— Unarine Ramaru

“We’d never talked about his parents, like he was some underwater Peter Pan.”
— Katherine McIntyre, By the Sea

“Never fear to lose your three square meal per day if that will cause you to be a fan of the truth. Never fear to have a decrease in the number of your friends if you should maintain the truth…”
— Israelmore Ayivor, The Great Hand Book of Quotes

“Beauty without a character is a waste.”
— Luffina Lourduraj

“It wasn’t so much that my mother always had to have her own way; it was more that if you disagreed with her, the rhetorical power this unleashed would shock you into seeing things from her point of view. The minute she sensed resistance, all of her intellect would be summoned into an irresistible arrowhead of purpose, and the most sensible strategic approach was therefore never to disagree with her too forcefully.”
— James Scudamore, The Amnesia Clinic

“I have lost and loved and won and cried myself to the person I am today.”
— Charlotte Eriksson, Empty Roads & Broken Bottles; in search for The Great Perhaps

“The loss of these tastes [for poetry and music] is a loss of happiness, and may possibly be injurious to the intellect, and more probably to the moral character, by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature.”
— Charles Darwin, The Autobiography of Charles Darwin, 1809-82

“J.R.R.Tolkien has confessed that about a third of the way through The Fellowship of the Ring, some ruffian named Strider confronted the hobbits in an inn, and Tolkien was in despair. He didn’t know who Strider was, where the book was going, or what to write next. Strider turns out to be no lesser person than Aragorn, the unrecognized and uncrowned king of all the forces of good, whose restoration to rule is, along with the destruction of the evil ring, the engine that moves the plot of the whole massive trilogy, The Lord of the Rings.”
— Ansen Dibell, Plot

“The first gift is Strength. May you remember to call upon it whenever you need it.”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“Humility is as good for the soul as it is for the memory”
— Patricia C. Wrede, Thirteenth Child

“The third gift is Courage. May you speak and act with confidence and use courage to follow your own path.”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“The ninth gift is Reverence. May you appreciate the wonder that you are and the miracle of all creation.”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“At the wondrous moment you were born, as you took your first breath, a great celebration was held in the heavens and twelve magnificent gifts were granted to you.”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“The eighth gift is Imagination. May it nourish your visions and dreams.”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“Use your gifts well and you will discover others, among them a gift that is uniquely you. See these noble gifts in other people. Share the truth and be ready for the miracle to unfold”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“The sixth gift is Joy. May it keep your heart open and filled with light.”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“The fourth gift is Compassion. May you be gentle with yourself and others. May you forgive those who hurt you and yourself when you make mistakes.”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“The tenth gift is Wisdom. Guiding your way, wisdom will lead you through knowledge to understanding. May you hear its soft voice.”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“The twelfth gift is Faith. May you believe”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“The fifth gift is Hope. Through each passage and season, may you trust the goodness of life.”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“The eleventh gift is Love. It will grow each time you give it away.”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“The second gift is Beauty. May your deeds reflect its depth.”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

“The seventh gift is Talent. May you discover your own special abilities and contribute them toward a better world.”
— Charlene Costanzo, The Twelve Gifts of Birth

tags: character-building, education, ethics, mentoring
tags: character, character-building, experience, habit, instinct, reincarnation
tags: activism, activist, adventures, belief, careers, challenges, character, character-building, choices, christ, compassion, courage, dreams, empathy, faith, fate, freedom, future, glee, goals, god, god-s-plan, happiness, homeless, hope, integrity, joy, leadership, life, life-missions, life-purpose, makes-sense, mental-disorders, messes, mistakes, morals, no-coincidences, no-ordinary-moments, nobody, novels, obstacles, past, pathways, plans, redemption, rescuers, scripts, signs, somebody, staying-positive, stories, storms, talents, tests, the-past, understanding, values
tags: character, character-building, character-development, good, goodness, kindness, nice, richelle, richelle-goodrich, tolerance
tags: achieving, character-building, gratitude, learning, life, purpose-of-life, richelle, richelle-goodrich, success, value, worth
tags: character-building
tags: character, character-building, character-development, fiction, know, understand
tags: character-building, humility, inspirational-quotes, layers, narrative, self-growth-and-improvement, shame
tags: analytical, character-building, writing-advice
tags: character, character-building, life, purpose-of-life, richelle, richelle-goodrich, volunteer
tags: appreciation, character-building, motivation, positivity, self-esteem, self-love, self-respect
tags: character-building
tags: character-building
tags: character-building, children, impressions, knowledge, molding, responsibility, upbringing, youth
tags: associates, buddies, character, character-building, friends, influence, relationships, richelle, richelle-e-goodrich, richelle-goodrich
tags: character-building, life-lessons, problems-quotes, quotes-on-life
tags: bohdi-sanders, character, character-building, character-development, respect
tags: character-building, politeness
tags: character-building, feelings, learning, living, mistakes, relationships, self-realization, shortcomings, wrongdoing
tags: character, character-building, character-development, character-quote, characteristics-of-leadership, men, reputation, reputation-management, reputation-quotes
tags: character-building, finding-yourself, forgiveness, oneself, regret, self-esteem
tags: absence, absence-and-attitude, character-building, cheating-spouse, hurts, life-and-living, loneliness, loneliness-quotes, love, love-quotes-and-sayings, teacher-quotes
tags: character-building, interest, leadership, passion, pursuit, relevance
tags: authority-and-attitude, bad-attitude, bad-intentions, character-building, credibility, desire, intentions, leadership-and-management, leadership-characteristics, needs, negative-attitude, personal-integrity, self-benefits, selfishness, wants
tags: character-building, empathy, objects
tags: accomplishments, character-building, experience, leadership, materialism, success, successful-living, tangibility, wisdom
tags: character-building, history, peter-pan, secrets, underwater
tags: character, character-building, day, decrease, every-day, everyday, fan-of-truth, fear, food-for-thought, friends, friendship, integrity, israelmore-ayivor, lose, maintain, meal, number, sincerity, speak-the-truth, square, tell-the-truth, three, true-leaders, truth, truthful
tags: beauty, beauty-in-life, beauty-of-nature, character, character-building, character-description, character-development, character-quote, true-beauty
tags: character-building, great-writing
tags: becoming, character-building, growing-up, heartbreak, learning-by-doing, life, living, love
tags: arts, character-building, emotions, intellect, music, poetry, stimulation, taste
tags: aragorn, character-building, fiction-writing, lord-of-the-rings, motivation, plot, strider, tolkien, writing-books
tags: blessing, character-building, inner-strength, inspiration, strength
tags: character-building, humility, lessons-learned, memory
tags: blessing, character-building, confidence, courage, individuality, inspiration
tags: blessing, character-building, creation, inspiration, respect, reverence, self-worth
tags: birth, blessed-event, born, breath, celebration, character-building, self-worth
tags: blessing, character-building, dreams, imagination, inspiration, self-worth
tags: blessing, character-building, furture, hope, inner-gifts, inspiration, miracle
tags: blessing, character-building, heart, inspiration, joy
tags: blessing, character-building, compassion, forgiveness, inspiration
tags: blessing, character-building, inner-guidance, inspiration, self-worth, wisdom
tags: character-building, faith-blessing, inspiration
tags: blessing, character-building, goodness, hope, inspiration
tags: blessing, character-building, inspiration, love
tags: beauty, blessing, character-building, inner-beauty, inspiration
tags: better-world, blessing, character-building, inspiration, self-worth, talent


Advertisements